ACG Update Newsletter "GI Five" Feature (December 2015 Issue)

Check out the latest ACG Update Newsletter from December 2015 for my "GI Five" feature Q&A along with future co-fellow Dr. Allison Yang (currently of Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN) where we discuss social media and gastroenterology at this year's #ACG2015 conference in Honolulu, HI.

#HCSM: Industry & The FDA

#HCSM: Industry & The FDA

Scroll down for the fifth entry of this 6-part blog series on Healthcare and Social Media!

  1. #HCSM Series: Listen Up Medical Providers
  2. #HCSM Series: Keeping It Professional
  3. #HCSM Series: For The Patients

  4. #HCSM Series: Public Health Impact

  5. #HCSM Series: Industry and the FDA
  6. #HCSM Series: Shaping Medical Education

Studies have shown that 60% of Americans turn to the internet for medical advice. It's obvious how social media naturally seems like another method pharmaceutical companies can quickly and easily advertise to consumers. Are pharmaceutical companies alone in trying to tap into our unconscious? Would you be surprised if I told you that you could be inadvertently perpetuating such behavior?  

Image credit: Public domain photo http://pixabay.com/p-71576/?no_redirect

Read More

#HCSM: Public Health Impact

#HCSM: Public Health Impact

Scroll down for the third entry of this 6-part blog series on Healthcare and Social Media!

Here is parte dos in the 6-part series of social media and healthcare!

  1. #HCSM Series: Listen Up Medical Providers
  2. #HCSM Series: Keeping It Professional
  3. #HCSM Series: For The Patients
  4. #HCSM Series: Impacting Public Health
  5. #HCSM Series: Industry and the FDA
  6. #HCSM Series: Shaping Medical Education

Given how social media is so widely used nowadays, it's not surprising that some have used it for public health purposes. As explored in previous sections, medical professionals use social media to educate, medical journals use it to share their content, pharmaceutical companies introduce their products through social media, and patients share their experiences and concerns. However, the capabilities reach far beyond raising awareness about health issues. Novel applications of social media that have impacted public health include emergency response and epidemic tracking. However, as easy as it might be to disseminate good information, there is little that can be done to screen for inaccuracies. Unfortunately, some of these inaccuracies can lead to adverse health and financial outcomes.

Read more after the jump!

(Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Read More

#HCSM Series: For The Patients

#HCSM Series: For The Patients

The utilization of social media by patients can potentially have public health implications. Both providers and patients should be cognizant of the benefits social media offers to patients. Various platforms exist, ranging from microblogging on Twitter to public forums like Medhelp, or social networking sites for patients like patientslikeme.com. To date, there has arguably been no easier way to facilitate discussion among those affected by a certain medical condition and establish communities, as well as identifying and accessing providers, support groups, and advocates. However, some have expressed concern of potential disadvantages. In addition to privacy concerns alluded to in the previous blog entry, some are concerned that patient-driven healthcare lacks accountability and that mass-sharing of anecdotes containing faulty medical evidence could be potentially hazardous. In case you're wondering, increased patient exposure to direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical marketing as a result of social media will be covered in Part 5!

Read more after the jump!

Read More

#HCSM Series: Keeping It Professional

#HCSM Series: Keeping It Professional

Here is parte dos in the 6-part series of social media and healthcare!

  1. #HCSM Series: Listen Up Medical Providers
  2. #HCSM Series: Keeping It Professional
  3. #HCSM Series: For The Patients
  4. #HCSM Series: Impacting Public Health
  5. #HCSM Series: Industry and the FDA
  6. #HCSM Series: Shaping Medical Education

Read full article after the jump.

Read More